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Work for pupils isolating due to COVID-19 symptoms

The links below contain work and research suggestions from across the school curriculum

English

 

Year 7

This fortnight we are continuing our study of the Frankenstein play by Philip Pullman. We have read up to the beginning of ACT 2.  We will now begin reading ACT 2.

  1. We will be looking at stage directions and how they are used to create tension. You should revise stage directions. Find an explanation on YouTube. You could then draw the stage following the stage directions.

  2. We are also looking at the concept of physiognomy. Research what it means and make a fact file on the term. Then write a PEE paragraph explaining how the Monster is affected by physiognomy. Quote needed - ‘Men see me, they hurt me – dogs – they shout, they throw stones. But I am good. I want to love them, not hurt...’ (The Monster is saying this).

  3. We are also looking at how it feels to be an outcast. Look up the word and define it. Then write a magazine article from the perspective of an outcast explaining what it is like to be an outcast. Challenge, could you link this to physiognomy?

  4. We will be writing an alternative ending to the play. You can write an ending which you predict will happen. Write this in script format.

 

Year 8

We are exploring the ways a writer structures texts and responding to statements on the texts, by providing our views on those statement and finding quotes to support those statements. This is in preparation for an assessment on a creative writing text on childhood.

  1. Re-read the opening paragraph of your reading book.

  2. Next to each paragraph in the opening chapter (or on a sheet of paper if it is a borrowed book or library book) write w few words to describe the focus of the opening paragraph. For example, ‘introducing the setting – time and place’, ‘introducing a character’ or ‘dialogue between ____ and ______’. Think about the writer wanted to give you this focus at the start.

  3. IN a different coloured pen, write or make a note of the time period of each paragraph. Write ‘past’, ‘present’ or ‘future’ for each paragraph. If a character jumps back to a past memory, consider if this could be a flashback (look up this term).

  4. Look for the ‘turning point’ or ‘volta’ in the chapter – when does the mood change? This is often at the point if highest tension in the chapter.

  5. Is there any foreshadowing (a hint of a later event in the chapter)? Highlight or write out the sentence which provides foreshadowing of a later event.

  6. How does the chapter end? Is there a cyclical structure (the same focus at the end of the chapter as at the beginning?

  7. Make a poster explaining in your own words the following terms:

  8. Volta

  9. Foreshadowing

  10. Cyclical structure

  11. Challenge task : flashback (look up this writer’s technique and include it in your poster

  12. Read over your notes and rite up your ideas into paragraphs, answering the following question: How does the writer use structure to interest the reader.

TIPS: writers always intend to build tension and create suspense – aim to use these underlined phrases in your written answer!

 

- Create a character study.

Choose an interesting character from your book and draw a small picture of them in the middle of your page. (If you do want to draw, try designing a font for their name to represent their personality). Around the picture, write down everything you know about the character. Add a quotation from the book to support your comments.

 

- Theme study*

Think of an overall theme which is explored in your book (e.g. friendship, feeling like an outsider, death etc.) Collect as many quotations/ references as you can which are relevant to this theme. Try to explain them.

 

- Comic strip / storyboard.

Retell the story, or part of the story, in pictures (aim for no more than ten!) Support each one with at least one quotation from the book.

 

- Write the blurb.*

Summarise the story in one short paragraph, being careful not spoil the best bits!

 

- Characters’ thoughts and feelings.

Draw a picture of your character to represent how they feel (This might be at a particular point in the story or it might be over the whole text). Make notes using the PEE method below.
Point: what they think or how they feel
Evidence: a quotation or reference from the text
Explanation: how / why does the quote show how they’re feeling / what they’re thinking?
(Top tip – try not to choose a really straightforward or obvious idea. Choose a ‘high value’ quote where there is lots to say! E.g. a description of a character’s body language, tone of voice or facial expression.)

 

- Create a past life.

Choose a character about whom the author doesn’t give much information (e.g. a mysterious character or a minor character). Create a past life for them, including details about their family, friends, childhood, home, school, job,  hobbies, crimes, secrets etc.

 

- Structure the plot.

After finishing a story, can you divide it up into these main sections, which are the classic structure of a story? (Write a brief summary of each section of the story to fit the four stages...)

Opening (the scene is set and characters are introduced)
Build up / problem (something important happens)
Climax (the most exciting bit)
Resolution (things are sorted out – either happily or unhappily)

If your story doesn’t neatly fit these sections, how has the author structured it differently? Is there more than one climax? Is there a dual narrative? What effect does the structure have?

 

- Plot timeline

Draw a timeline to represent events in your story. Illustrate it and use quotations to show each key event. You could even extend the timeline into the past and/or future with your own ideas.

 

 

Year 9

  1. Wilfred Owen Exposure – read the poem Exposure. You can find it easily online. Print/save a copy for annotations

  2. Use the web to find out key points and ideas. Go here first and then see where the web takes you. There are lots of revision videos online too. https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/zwbxp39/revision/1

Answer the following questions using evidence from the poem:

  1. What is Owen suggesting is the biggest threat to the soldiers?

  2. What is Owen ‘exposing’?

  3. What did he want the readers to think/feel/realise?

  4. Some people think Exposure should not have been published at all – to what extent do you agree?

Ted Hughes - Bayonet Charge:

  1. Bayonet Charge – read the poem. You can find it easily online. Print/save a copy for annotations

  2. Use the web to find out key points and ideas. Go here first and then see where the web takes you. There are lots of revision videos online too. https://pmt.physicsandmathstutor.com/download/English-Literature/GCSE/Notes/AQA/Poetry/Power-and-Conflict-Anthology/Bayonet%20Charge%20-%20Ted%20Hughes.pdf

  3. Answer the following questions using evidence from the poem:

  4. What is Hughes suggesting about war?

  5. What is Hughes ‘suggesting about nature?

  6. What did he want the readers to think/feel/realise?

  7. Some people think Bayonet Charge should not have been published at all – to what extent do you agree?

 

 

Year 10

You should have finished Act 1 in class and if you have been at home you will need to research what has happened in Act 1.  Read about Act 1 using the Spark Notes below.
https://www.sparknotes.com/drama/an-inspector-calls/section1/

List the major events of Act 1. 

Create a chart of all the characters and add in words that describe them and choose some quotes from

Act 1 that you think are good.  Quotes available below:
https://youtu.be/Iq9srVhLavk

Answer the question below:

Who did the worst thing to Eva: Mr Birling or Sheila? 

Explain how she was treated and give your own personal response.

Answer the question below when you have studied the end of Act and the beginning of Act 2:

Gerald treated Eva far worse than Mr Birling or Sheila – discuss. 

Begin to research Act 2 so you know what is happening. 

 

 

Year 11

Introduction to Macbeth

  • Revise the plot and characters of Macbeth (which you should remember to an extent from year 9).

https://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/macbeth/summary/
https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zgq3dmn

  • Research the context of the play. Find out about:

  • What life was like for Shakespeare at the time he wrote Macbeth

  • Where he got his ideas for the play from

  • What people believed about witches and witchcraft at the time

  • How King James influenced Shakespeare's writing of the play

  • What life was like for women in Jacobean England.

https://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/macbeth/context/
https://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/macbeth/context/historical/witchcraft-in-shakespeares-england/